Parasite (Gisaengchung)

Critics Consensus

An urgent, brilliantly layered look at timely social themes, Parasite finds writer-director Bong Joon Ho in near-total command of his craft.

99%

TOMATOMETER

Total Count: 321

93%

Audience Score

Verified Ratings: 2,692
User image

Tap to review this movie

  • User image

    Super Reviewer

    Rate this movie

    Oof, that was Rotten.

    Meh, it passed the time.

    It’s good – I’d recommend it.

    Awesome!

    So Fresh: Absolute Must See!

    Step 1 of 2

    What did you think of the movie? (optional)



  • You're almost there! Just confirm how you got your ticket.

  • User image

    Super Reviewer

    Step 2 of 2

    How did you get your ticket?

    • Fandango

    • AMC (Coming Soon)

      We won’t be able to verify your ticket today, but it’s great to know for the future.

    • Cinemark (Coming Soon)

      We won’t be able to verify your ticket today, but it’s great to know for the future.

    • Regal (Coming Soon)

      We won’t be able to verify your ticket today, but it’s great to know for the future.

    • Bought somewhere else

    You're almost there! Just confirm how you got your ticket.

  • User image

    Super Reviewer

    Rate this movie

    Oof, that was Rotten.

    Meh, it passed the time.

    It’s good – I’d recommend it.

    Awesome!

    So Fresh: Absolute Must See!

    What did you think of the movie? (optional)

    Verify I bought my ticket from

    How did you get your ticket?

    • Fandango

    • AMC (Coming Soon)

      We won’t be able to verify your ticket today, but it’s great to know for the future.

    • Cinemark (Coming Soon)

      We won’t be able to verify your ticket today, but it’s great to know for the future.

    • Regal (Coming Soon)

      We won’t be able to verify your ticket today, but it’s great to know for the future.

    • Bought somewhere else

      We won’t be able to verify your ticket today, but it’s great to know for the future.

  • How did you get your ticket?

    • Fandango

    • AMC (Coming Soon)

      We won’t be able to verify your ticket today, but it’s great to know for the future.

    • Cinemark (Coming Soon)

      We won’t be able to verify your ticket today, but it’s great to know for the future.

    • Regal (Coming Soon)

      We won’t be able to verify your ticket today, but it’s great to know for the future.

    • Bought somewhere else

Tickets & Showtimes

The movie doesn't seem to be playing near you.

Go back
Enter your location to see showtimes near you.

Parasite (Gisaengchung) Videos

Where to watch

Parasite (Gisaengchung) Photos

Movie Info

Bong Joon Ho brings his work home to Korea in this pitch-black modern fairytale. Meet the Park Family: the picture of aspirational wealth. And the Kim Family, rich in street smarts but not much else. Be it chance or fate, these two houses are brought together and the Kims sense a golden opportunity. Masterminded by college-aged Ki-woo, the Kim children expediently install themselves as tutor and art therapist, to the Parks. Soon, a symbiotic relationship forms between the two families. The Kims provide "indispensable" luxury services while the Parks obliviously bankroll their entire household. When a parasitic interloper threatens the Kims' newfound comfort, a savage, underhanded battle for dominance breaks out, threatening to destroy the fragile ecosystem between the Kims and the Parks.

Cast

News & Interviews for Parasite (Gisaengchung)

Critic Reviews for Parasite (Gisaengchung)

All Critics (321) | Top Critics (45) | Fresh (318) | Rotten (3)

  • If the movie is a Rorschach of who you identify as parasite and host, it's a test you're just as likely to fail; a filmgoing experience that refuses to fit into any box, and forces viewers to breathe the dangerous air outside of it too.

    Dec 11, 2019 | Rating: A- | Full Review…
  • Let's just say that by "Parasite's" conclusion, what started out as a comedy of manners has become a furious snarl of rage and his most arresting social satire yet.

    Dec 11, 2019 | Full Review…

    Bob Mondello

    NPR
    Top Critic
  • It isn't an easy ride, and as with life in the non-metaphorical world, the destination is uncertain. You'll see strange and wonderful things along the way.

    Dec 11, 2019 | Full Review…
  • It's a fitting movie for our times, and Joon-ho delivers with uncompromising clarity and vision. See it before the inevitable American remake sands down all its razor sharp edges.

    Nov 3, 2019 | Rating: A | Full Review…
  • Just as many of the director's previous efforts have defied pigeonholing, Parasite delights in ping-ponging from one genre to another, defying expectations along the way.

    Nov 3, 2019 | Rating: 3.5/4 | Full Review…
  • It's a nearly perfect film, from Bong's masterful use of framing and visual language and control of a wildly shifting tone to the performances (all terrific) to the commentary on class division.

    Oct 24, 2019 | Rating: 5/5 | Full Review…

Audience Reviews for Parasite (Gisaengchung)

  • 5d ago
    This movie is good from beginning to end, despite how out of hand it gets. The ridiculousness gets amped up with every act, but the humor and intrigue remain constant. The screenplay is very good, and the acting jobs are great, particularly by Song Kang Ho. A very enjoyable film from the first moment until the last.
    Sanjay R Super Reviewer
  • Dec 01, 2019
    Parasite is a twisty, energetic ride at the movies, balancing a light-heartedness with thriller-like tension. Aside from its enjoyability as a film - largely due to its superb cast and writing - Parasite makes a visually stunning statement on class and society in the modern age. It's not always perfect, and may stretch itself to wild extremes, but it's a cinematic experience you'll want to come back to again and again, and one of 2019's definite must-sees.
    Matthew S Super Reviewer
  • Nov 09, 2019
    Watching this movie without knowing anything, not reading the synopsis, no watching the trailer, no expectation at all besides all the good and positive review from a bunch of people. Nor that I know before that Parasite took home Palme d' Or at this year's Cannes Film Festival. And... damn just damn!! This movie turns out to be a really good movie!! So good that after the twist in the middle of the movie, I can't even blink my eyes even just for a second. Even the ending makes me to hold my breath for quite time. Now I know why Parasite took home that most prestigious award. To describe Parasite is like when you bought a K*nd*rj*y, you like the toy when you open it (to describe the twist in the middle), and surprisingly found liquor after you bite the chocolate (like the best dessert you ever tasted). And yes, it is just that damn good! Bong Joon Ho succesfully gave a light story and more comedy at the beginning, getting a little serious with a genre change in the middle, and gave us the perfect twist with that ending. There's nothing more that I will spill about this movie, just go and see it for yourself since this movie will definitely blow your mind. And if you like Japanese movie The Shoplifters who also took out Palme d' Or last year and being nominated as Best Foreign Film at the Oscars and Golden Globes last year (if it's not because of Rome, Shoplifters would bag those awards for sure), you definitely would love this movie too.
    Sanjaya & Super Reviewer
  • Nov 03, 2019
    SEOUL SURVIVORS - My Review of PARASITE (4 1/2 Stars) It would be understandable to watch the first ten minutes of Parasite, the new film from Bong Joon Ho (Snowpiercer, The Host) and think you've stumbled into an alternate universe version of Shoplifters. Both feature an Asian family of grifters living in a hovel and preying on people with money. Both won the prestigious Cannes Film Festival's top prize a year apart. While both excellent films, Parasite is to Shoplifters what No Strings Attached was to Friends With Benefits. I won't chase comparisons any further than that, because Parasite is a staggering work of art worth putting on its very own pedestal. Bong Joon Ho has delighted in subverting our expectations within specific genres, whether it's a monster movie, a chase film, or an environmental issues farce. His films have often explored the marked differences between the haves and the have nots. With Parasite, he and co-writer Han Jin Won bring this social dichotomy to the world of the home invasion thriller, creating a masterful, screw-tightening, devastatingly powerful gut punch of a movie. I'll set up the basic premise but spoil nothing in this review, as the surprises merit fresh eyes. The Kim family live in a damp basement apartment which affords them a view of drunken men urinating right outside their street level window. They subsist on odd jobs like folding pizza boxes and dream of better lives which they can see on their iPhones whenever they're able to piggyback onto their neighbor's WiFi. This foursome, played by Kang-ho Song, a Bong Joon Ho regular, as the father Ki-taek, Hye-jin Jang as the mother Chung-sook, Woo-Sir Choi as the young son Ki-woo and So-dam Park as the daughter, deserve a break. Good fortune strikes them one day when Ki-woo's friend tells informs him he's traveling overseas and needs him to cover for him as an English tutor for the daughter the wealthy Park family of four. Ki-woo impresses the parents, who live in a sleek modern mansion in a well-to-do section of Seoul. The father, Dong-ik (Sun-kyun Lee) owns a tech company and has the shuffling gait of a man used to his creature comforts. The mother, Yeon-kyo (Yeo-jeong Jo) oozes compassion and beauty despite not always being aware of her surroundings. They raise their young children in a bubble which gets burst wide open with the arrival of Ki-woo. Soon, enough, the rest of the Kim family insidiously infiltrates the Parks' lives, and my story description ends here. Needless to say, Parasite draws you in with its basic premise and then, like the best of Hitchcock and Kubrick, turns it on its ear and makes you gasp. The majority of the film delights in revealing every little shift which occurs in that gorgeously stark home until you slowly realize that everything has changed. In an instant, however, things go bonkers (you'll know it when you see it), but it doesn't so much feel like a tonal shift as it feels like an organic extension of our poor family's desperation. The film doesn't feature a human antagonist. The Kim's do what they need to do to survive in a tough world, and the Parks are mostly kind to their employees, although they do separate themselves a bit by noticing that poor people have certain smells. It's enough of a detail to evoke a ton of empathy for the Kims. Make no mistake. This is a movie-movie. It has grand set pieces and almost unbearable suspense. I've never before witnessed the preparing of a ramen type dish in the context of a nail-biting moment, but there it is for Bong Joon Ho to mess with his audience for several agonizing minutes. Same goes for a sliding shelf door, a living room table, a light switch, a flooding apartment, and an innocent enough outdoor party. What the filmmaker seems to be saying is that what separates the classes is merely a thin veneer. We're all one tiny moment away from losing everything. It doesn't hurt that the assembled cast shines. I especially loved the interplay between Kang-ho and Hye-jin as the parents. Their increasingly dire circumstances bring them closer together with each showing the other tenderness despite the mayhem. I also loved Yeon-kyo's guileless performance as the too-easily impressed mom. Had she done a little Googling, she may have prevented what ensues, but she seems to love people, so it's hard to hate her. For a moment near the end, the air leaks out of the tires with a sequence slightly out of step with what precedes it. I should have known better to question it, as Bong Joon Ho is a master filmmaker. Of course it would swing around again to produce an unforgettably heartbreaking final moment. It's up there with the great movie endings. Bong Joon Ho uses everything in his powers to achieve this instant classic. His cinematographer, Kyung-pyo Hong, understands how to present space in a frame and how to mine suspense out of every slight camera move. Ha-jun Lee's production design presents a vivid contrast between the two main homes. Jail Jung's orchestral score gives the film an appropriate heft, worthy of such big flights of musical fancy. Parasite is a movie of its time as each of us circle around the ever-diminishing musical chairs. We don't know when the music will stop, but when it does, some of us are in for a world of hurt. At least we may still find beauty in it if great filmmakers like Bong Joon Ho have a seat at the table.
    Glenn G Super Reviewer

Parasite (Gisaengchung) Quotes

There are no approved quotes yet for this movie.

News & Features